Safety Tips

Personal Safety

  • Stay alert and tuned in to your surroundings, wherever you are.
  • Don’t be taken by surprise. Be aware and be prepared.
  • Stand tall and walk confidently. Don’t show fear. Don’t look like a victim.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel uncomfortable in a place or situation, leave right away and get help if necessary.
  • Try not to walk or jog alone. Take a friend or neighbor along for company.
  • Get to know the neighborhoods and neighbors where you live and work.
  • Carry your purse close to your body and keep a firm grip on it.
  • Avoid pickpockets by carrying your wallet in an inside coat pocket or front trouser pocket.

In Your Car

  • Always lock your car and take the keys, even if you’ll be gone only a short time.
  • Keep your car in good running condition, and keep the tank at least one-quarter full.
  • Lock doors while driving.
  • If your car breaks down, raise the hood and place emergency reflectors or flares. Then stay in the locked car. When someone stops to help, don’t get out. Ask him or her, through a closed or cracked window, to telephone the police to come and help.
  • If you’re coming or going after dark, park in a well-lit area that will still be well-lit when you return.
  • Leave only your ignition key with a parking attendant. Don’t leave your house key, garage door opener, or other important items in your car.
  • Never pick up hitchhikers.
  • Control your keys. Never leave an identification tag on your key ring. If your keys are lost or stolen, it could help a thief locate your car and burglarize your home.
  • Tips to keep you safe if your vehicle breaks down (from AAA Road Safety Tips):
    • Move your vehicle off the road safely away from traffic.
    • Stay inside your vehicle and make sure all passengers stay inside, too. Keep doors locked and only roll down the window enough to ask any passersby to call police.
    • If you can’t move your vehicle off the road, ask all passengers to exit the vehicle when it is safe to do so, and stand away from traffic.
      If you must walk to a phone, keep your group together.
    • Warn other drivers by raising the vehicle’s hood, tying a white cloth to a door handle or using reflective triangles or flares. Warning devices should be placed far enough away from the vehicle to give oncoming traffic time to react. A good rule of thumb: three devices at 100, 50 and 25 yards from the vehicle or 300, 200 or 100 feet.